On Winter Trees, the Fruit of Rain

avid Gray’s “Life in Slow Motion” has spent a lot of driving time with me of late, and I especially find myself waiting for “Ain’t No Love.” Gray has a way of playing the piano slowly while rushing through the lyrics at double-speed, creating tension that still seems to flow without effort.About a man trying to convince himself that he’s lost faith (okay, in my head that’s what it’s about, but when I listen to a song, it’s about what I say it’s about, right?) there’s plenty of sad imagery involving a little girl which tugs at me with thoughts of my own little one, but there’s also enough word painting to make it a lyric-writing lesson. I especially like the opening of the last verse:

David Gray’s “Life in Slow Motion” has spent a lot of driving time with me of late, and I especially find myself waiting for “Ain’t No Love.” Gray has a way of playing the piano slowly while rushing through the lyrics at double-speed, creating tension that still seems to flow without effort.

About a man trying to convince himself that he’s lost faith (okay, in my head that’s what it’s about, but when I listen to a song, it’s about what I say it’s about, right?) there’s plenty of sad imagery involving a little girl which tugs at me with thoughts of my own little one, but there’s also enough word painting to make it a lyric-writing lesson. I especially like the opening of the last verse:

 On winter trees the fruit of rain Is hanging trembling in the branches Like a thousand diamond buds

As always, it’s surrounded by an album full of excellent writing and performing, and includes lots of groovy extras on the DVD side of the dual-disc format.

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