Latest: Lotus
Did You Miss This? Wine into Water?

9 Ways Your Fans Can Support You

My wife Sue provides social media marketing services for authors. I am, of course, her most important client. I’ve asked her to share some of her checklists and tools with you. We’d both love to hear if this type of information is helpful.—Joel

Sue L Canfield
When your fans share your writing with others it carries more social proof than your own marketing efforts because it comes from a third party. Make it easy for them. Real fans are glad to help.

Do you have all the following in place so your fans are connected with you and sharing your posts with their friends?

  1. Connect with your fans on the following social media platforms.
  2. Ask your fans to share your social media posts by doing the following.
    • Retweet something you shared on Twitter.
    • Share a post from your Facebook Author page on their own Facebook timeline.
    • Repin something from one of your Pinterest boards.
    • Share one of your status updates on LinkedIn.
    • Comment on one of your Instagram posts.
    • On Goodreads, recommend one of your books to your friends.
  3. Ask fans to sign up for your newsletter.
  4. Ask fans to share the link to sign up for your newsletter.
  5. Ask fans to subscribe to your blog and to comment at the blog. Write a blog post about how they can support you. (See Joel’s at his author website)
  6. Directly ask them to buy your books.
  7. Encourage fans to buy a copy of one of your books for a friend who they think will enjoy it.
  8. Ask fans to review your books on Amazon.
  9. Let fans know you’d love to hear from them and to send you an email.

Let your fans know that supportive things like reviews at Amazon, comments at the blog, enthusiastic shares on social media and even personal emails help make you enthusiastic about continuing to write.

Author Bio:
Sue L Canfield has been working with social media since 2005. She blogs regularly about how to use social media and consults on best social media practices at Chief Virtual Officer. She specializes in helping authors create and maintain their online presence. She currently manages a team of four social media account managers and over a dozen social media clients.


9 Ways You Can Help Support My Husband the Author

Sue L Canfield
Sue L Canfield
Because I’m not only Joel’s biggest fan but also his social media marketing manager, he asked me to share a few ways that you, his other fans, can support him as an author.

  1. Connect with Joel on the following social media platforms.
  1. Share Joel’s social media posts.
  • Retweet something shared on Twitter.
  • Share a post from Joel’s Facebook Author page on your Facebook timeline.
  • Repin something from one of Joel’s Pinterest boards.
  • Share one of Joel’s status updates on LinkedIn.
  1. Sign up for Joel’s monthly newsletter. Joel sends out a monthly newsletter about his mysteries the middle of each month. It’s the first place you’ll hear about his new books, even before they are published. It always includes links to his previous blog posts which are often short book excerpts. Anyone who signs up for the newsletter gets two free books. One is the first Phil Brennan book, A Long, Hard Look, (which, though each book stands alone, you might want to read before the second Phil Brennan book, A Still, Small Voice, comes out in December.) The other free book, since Joel forgot to remove the download for it and he’ll probably never get around to it, is Through the Fog, an Irish Mystery.
  1. Share the link to sign up for the newsletter. Remember, if you recommend the newsletter to a friend, you’re essentially giving them two free books!
  1. Subscribe to Joel’s blog. You’ll see at the blog in the left sidebar where to subscribe – it says Get new posts by email. Just put in your email address and never miss another blog post. Don’t forget to comment at the blog as well.
  1. Buy Joel’s books. You can find them at his website here and on Amazon.
  1. Buy a copy of one of Joel’s books for a friend who you think will enjoy it but hasn’t yet discovered his books.
  1. Review Joel’s books on Amazon. If you’ve read any of Joel’s books, please provide an honest review at Amazon.
  1. Send Joel an email. He loves to hear from his fans. Whether you want to provide feedback, ask a question, share how you supported him, or anything else, Joel would love to hear from you! His email is Joel@JoelDCanfield.com

Because authors are emotional creatures, and I know from experience this is especially true of Joel, supportive things like reviews at Amazon, comments at the blog, enthusiastic shares on social media and even personal emails help make an author enthusiastic about continuing to write. [And easier to live with.—jdc]


Nice Guys Make Boring Reading

edgesGreat character advice from Steven Pressfield in the form of a question:

“How close are they to the edge?”

When a character teeters on a knife-edge, we can’t take our eyes off them.

My characters feel a bit safe. For my light mysteries, that’s okay. For the deeper Chandleresque cozy I’m working on, Jake needs to be closer to the edge.

But wait and see what “edge” he’s close to.


“Found Around the Web” Fiction Writing

Angela AckermanToday’s resource is from The Creative Penn Blog by Joanna Penn. She recently posted an article by Angela Ackerman.

Angela discusses creating character personality traits to make your story richer. Her resource books help writers create layered, compelling characters that readers relate to and care for. Read more at The Creative Penn Blog.


“Found Around the Web” Writing Resources

Carol TiceWe’ll be posting a couple on Tuesdays and Thursdays other writing resources we’ve “found around the web”.

Today’s resource is Carol Tice, an award-winning, fun-loving freelance writer living in the Seattle area. Carol’s blog is “Make a Living Writing…practical help for hungry writers.”


Local Authors at Our Local Library

Local Authors at Our Local LibrarySue contacted our local library, The Rice Lake Public Library, to ask them about their policies concerning carrying local authors and self-published books. Below are her questions and the responses.

1. Will the local library carry books written by local authors? We will and do. However, in order to be purchased for inclusion in our general collection, local authors need to meet our general selection guidelines which include Continue reading “Local Authors at Our Local Library”


Year-End Wrap Up and 3 New Published Clients

It’s the last day of 2013 and it’s been Someday Box’s best year! Here are some of the things we accomplished this year.

  • Helped half a dozen authors determine why they should write a book, what specifically that book should be about, who it should be written for, and how to make it happen by means of a Pathfinding Session and Road Map
  • Coached two clients to get their books written
  • Assisted three new clients get their books published in 2013

It was especially exciting to have two clients publish their books within just a couple of weeks of each other. Were we ever busy! You’ll want to check out each of their books.

client books published in 2013

First up was Simon Forder who published Continue reading “Year-End Wrap Up and 3 New Published Clients”


Call Me Pollyanna (Guest Post by John “Pollyanna” O’Leary)

I met John on a series of phone calls hosted by our mutual friend Trevor Gay, who, like us, is mad as a hatter. John is working on a book, and like many of you, he’s taking forever.

photo http://www.sxc.hu/photo/80376 by Jeff Prieb http://www.sxc.hu/profile/ctechsHere on Someday Box Joel often lays out the case for self-publishing your book—instead of chasing the REALLY BIG PUBLISHING DEAL. I would have to agree that there are benefits to self-publishing. But based on my experiences as a writer (and author of the forthcoming book, Business Lessons From Rock) I believe it’s only fair that you should hear the other side of the argument. Let me take a moment to enumerate the advantages of pursuing a major publisher. There are many.

Continue reading “Call Me Pollyanna (Guest Post by John “Pollyanna” O’Leary)”


Married to an Author

Joel and Sue CanfieldI’m married to an author. I work with an author. In fact, many authors. In my work for Someday Box I’ve worked with a dozen authors or so this year. In my virtual assistant business I’ve worked with another dozen or so this past year. So I know quite a bit about authors.

If you are married to an author, you know authors can have their quirks.

Continue reading “Married to an Author”


What Question Can You Answer Best? (Guest Post by Phil Wrzesinski )

I’ve known Phil for some time. His intense love for his family sometimes outshines the fact that he is a brilliant marketer and incredible teacher.

?My first book started writing itself the day a local childcare owner asked me, “Phil, I shop a lot, and I have to say, your store has the best customer service I’ve ever encountered. What is your secret?”

The short answer was simple. I hire good people.

She pressed me further. “Can you do a presentation to our Child Care Association about it?”

Sure.

Now I needed a longer answer. Fortunately, the answer was there and pretty soon I had a presentation and the outline for a book.

The funny thing is that I never set out to write a book. I think the book had a life of its own, born when the question was asked. At least a dozen times throughout the process I wondered what made me think I was capable of writing a book. Mostly I ignored that thought and kept writing. After all, I was just answering a question.

Your business has the answer to a question, too. There is something you do better than most other businesses. You have a philosophy, a reason, a method for why you do what you do and how it makes your business better. It may be one of your own design, or one you stole from someone else, or one you pieced together from several sources. Someone has probably already asked you why or how you do what you do.

You just have to start writing it down.

My second book started the same way – with a question.

Continue reading “What Question Can You Answer Best? (Guest Post by Phil Wrzesinski )”


The Language of Young Adult Fiction (Guest Post by Cheryl Campbell)

Say hello again to Cheryl Campbell, YA author with an unusual perspective I admire.

Burnt Mountain The Monster Within was born from an idea that I wanted to try to write a story that my niece (at the time 5 years old) and nephew (at the time 3 years old) might enjoy as teenagers. I figured this would give me plenty of time to come up with something, and plenty of time to figure out how to get it done. I had never written a book before and had zero clue about how to do it. So I sat down, jotted some notes, typed a few pages, and kept chipping away at it. Many revisions later it started to take on some shape.

As I kept going, the shape became more recognizable as a story. I was watching movies and reading a lot to figure out what made the stories that I loved so great. Lord of the Rings, both the books and the movies were key factors in my research. Star Wars also ranked at the top. What I loved so much about them was the way they crossed all age groups. Anyone, any age could get in to see Star Wars. No profanity. No sex. No graphic violence. Both franchises had movies with some violence, but none of them were rated R.

Continue reading “The Language of Young Adult Fiction (Guest Post by Cheryl Campbell)”


Rice Lake Public Library Presentation January 18 2014

We’ve arranged with our local library to present in person “Taking the Pain & Mystery Out of Becoming a Writer”.
Rice Lake Public Library Event January 2014
Date: Saturday, January 18, 2014
Time: 2:00 pm CST to 3:30 pm CST
Where: Rice Lake Public Library, Friendship Room, 2 E. Marshall Street

This is no charge to attend!

Details and more information can be found in our Events section.

For more information please contact:
Sue L Canfield 715 296 0347



Growing Up with Burl Ives and Perry Como

[az]B000XU8VY4[/az]When I was growing up I don’t remember my dad ever listening to music for pleasure – not on the radio or records. My mom occasionally put on a vinyl record. We did have a record player and a small collection of vinyl records. A very small collection – less than two dozen I’m sure.

Continue reading “Growing Up with Burl Ives and Perry Como”


Ropin’ the Wind with Garth Brooks

[az]B000EN0TIG[/az]Back in 1992 I was introduced to Garth Brooks by a friend from Texas. I hadn’t really been a huge country fan before then. My friend was staying with me at the time and wanted to watch the Country Music Awards. I was hooked after hearing Garth Brooks perform. Today, though I don’t listen to even new country much, I still love to listen to Garth Brooks.

In the summer of 1992 Garth came to San Diego, California, where I was then living. Continue reading “Ropin’ the Wind with Garth Brooks”